Will this liquid revolutionize your closeup magic?

black_liquidThis innovative liquid transforms one of magic’s most popular tools into an even more versatile method.

When the liquid is applied and allowed to dry, it removes the gimmick’s telltale shine and replaces it with a light-absorbing, flat-black invisibility. And unlike other methods for “cloaking,” this liquid works its magic with only a slight reduction to the gimmick’s strength.

Visibility is one of the two major reasons cited by magicians for not using this gimmick as part of their regular closeup repertoire.

The second reason is frustration.

But today, both problems are easily solved.

The black liquid in the picture—formula SR9—is a very special mixture of synthetic and natural ingredients compounded together for the exclusive purpose of removing shine and providing camouflage for polyurethane-polyurea copolymers and aliphatic polyamides: Invisible Elastic Thread and Nylon/Kevlar Invisible Threads.

For years, individual magicians and independent manufacturers have used repurposed dyes and pigments, even black markers, to color their Invisible Thread to reduce visibility under performance conditions.

Since the surface of Invisible Thread is slippery like plastic, the only colorants that will stick contain a solvent, which destroys the thread wall and weakens it dramatically.

With a basic understanding of how these polymers bond together, one will immediately recognize the damage that can be done by removing even a nanoscale layer of the thread wall—a variable of great importance for static fibers, multiplied exponentially for the delicate structure of elastic threads.

Some magicians have given up entirely and have chosen a black Invisible Elastic Thread for closeup applications. But the color is not what the audience glimpses from the corner of their eye. It is the hint of shine reflected from ambient light. Black Invisible Thread is often just as shiny as its white/clear counterpart.

Magicians have balanced a tradeoff: alter the molecular structure of the thread, reducing its strength, or run the risk of flashing under ambient light.

SR9 is phobic to common IT and IET polymers. It wraps around the structure of the thread, concealing it without altering the structure of the thread itself. Does it still reduce strength? Yes, to a small degree. The particles are so fine they can embed in microscopic cracks and imperfections in the thread, adding weight and causing friction. Compared to harsh solvents, however, this reduction in strength is trivial.

SR9 solves the visibility problem, but it still leaves the second issue: Invisible Thread is a huge hassle.

Here is the truth about Invisible Thread…

Almost everything you want to perform with “regular” Invisible Thread—Nylon and Kevlar—can be performed with Invisible Elastic Thread, bypassing much of the frustration.

With Invisible Elastic Thread, 1) there is no stripping of a single thread from a bundle of other strands; 2) its elasticity absorbs minor shock loads that will snap regular IT; 3) it acts as its own reel.

The last example is the “reel” reason you should pay attention.

A thread reel adjusts the length of Invisible Thread during performance.

Anchored Invisible Elastic Thread performs similarly without a reel.

The elasticity of a high-quality Invisible Elastic Thread mimics the performance of a static thread in a thread reel, but with much less bother—providing you have the proper setup.

cylinderTypically, Invisible Elastic Thread is supplied wound on a spool or bobbin. Performing with IET while it is still attached to the spool causes the loose end of the thread to dig in under the rest of the supply. When the thread breaks, the end is lost. The spool is useless.

The secret is to wind about ten feet of the thread onto another cylinder. Unwind the amount you want to use—one foot will get you three-to-five feet depending on the brand—and then slip the thread into a double notch to hold tight the thread not in use at the time. Put the cylinder in your shirt pocket and you are ready to go.

When the working end of the thread is stretched, the burden is at the notches, leaving the balance of the thread untouched. When the thread snaps, the loose end is right there at the notch, ready to be WaxTaqed. You are setup for the next performance.

With this technique, you might get fifty performances out of ten feet of thread, instead of [barely] one performance from a hundred-foot spool. PK magic at your fingertips!

Click HERE to try SR9 Cloaking Fluid in an easy-to-use applicator pen.

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About Aaron Smith

Aaron Smith, owner of The Magic Depot, is a writer, illustrator, and magic creator. Follow Best Kept Secrets and The Magic Depot @magicdepot on Twitter.